THE VEIL: VISIBLE AND INVISIBLE SPACES

 

March 30 - May 7, 2010



The Veil: Visible & Invisible Spaces is a traveling exhibition that investigates the veil in its broadest and most universal contexts. This exhibition focuses on the great tradition and importance of the veil throughout human history and the clich├ęs and stereotypes that challenge modern society.

The veiling of women, men and sacred places has existed among people of countless cultures and religions from time immemorial. Veiling began long before Islam and spans geographies far beyond the Middle East, yet it is vastly misunderstood, and is today a battleground for power and political
agendas.

The twenty-nine artists in The Veil: Visible & Invisible Spaces examine contemporary issues such as modesty, oppression, liberation and freedom of expression. These artists also explore spirituality, nature and magic. They represent diverse societies, diverse spiritual practices and diverse points of view. These artists challenge, condemn, praise and embrace the veil and veiling. Their works converse with one another to create a bigger picture of the universal history, folklore and politics of the veil.

On behalf of Kean University, I want to thank the artists for lending all the works being shown and Jennifer Heath for her efforts and insight in bringing this exhibition together. As curator of this show, Jennifer Heath has created a relevant and fascinating exhibition. For the installation, we are grateful to our gallery assistants Kelly Murphy, Lisa Conrad, Samantha Jackson and Kristen Oshust. Special thanks go to Kean University President Dawood Farahi, Vice President Mark Lender, and Holly Logue, Acting Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts. We appreciate their support for the growing exhibition program and the opportunity to explore this engaging subject of veils and veiling.

For more information on this exhibition please visit: www.theveilbook.com

Neil Tetkowski
Director of University Galleries

 

Images: Anita Kunz, Girls will be Girls, pigment print
Sama Alshaibi, Witness, digital archival print